Poetry Class–Emily Dickenson

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Poetry Class is now in session! Why you might ask? I say why not. From time to time I’ll post a bio of a poet and hopefully inspire you to read a poem or two. This week’s poet is Emily Dickenson.

 

Emily Dickenson was born on December 10, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts and is recognized as one of the most important American poets of the 1800s. Considered an eccentric by locals, she became known for her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, to even leave her bedroom. Dickinson never married, and most friendships between her and others depended entirely upon correspondence.

Less than a dozen of her nearly 1,800 poems were published during her lifetime. Dickinson’s poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring topics in letters to her friends.

Although Dickinson’s acquaintances were most likely aware of her writing, it was not until after her death in 1886—when Lavinia, Dickinson’s younger sister, discovered her most of her poems.

Success is counted sweetest

Success is counted sweetest
By those who ne’er succeed.
To comprehend a nectar
Requires sorest need.
Not one of all the purple Host
Who took the Flag today
Can tell the definition
So clear of victory
As he defeated – dying –
On whose forbidden ear
The distant strains of triumph
Burst agonized and clear!

YOUR TURN: Any thoughts about Emily or her poetry?

God Bless & Good Reading!

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